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2017 Tine Haworth Cardiovascular Research Day

Submitted by leslie.campbell on Fri, 03/03/2017 - 12:01pm

2017 Tine Haworth Cardiovascular Research Day

Event Information

What is the Tine Haworth Cardiovascular Research Day?
It is an annual event hosted by the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta that includes presentations from external and internal speakers that will showcase insightful, cutting-edge cardiovascular research. The day will also showcase a poster competition and rapid fire talks from trainees and speakers from the Libin Institute.

Who can attend the event and how do I register?
This is a free, public event so anyone is welcome. Click the button to register.

Eventbrite - Tine Haworth Cardiovascular Research Day 2017

Questions regarding abstract submission and or poster presentation may be directed to libinres@ucalgary.ca 

2017 Dr. ER Smith Lecturer, Dr. Milica Radisic

Dr. Milica Radisic is Professor at the University of Toronto and Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Functional Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering. She obtained B.Eng. from McMaster University in 1999, and Ph.D. form the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2004, both in Chemical Engineering. She is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

The long term objective of Dr. Radisic’s research is to enable cardiovascular regeneration through tissue engineering and development of new biomaterials.  Her research interests also include microfluidic cell separation and development of in vitro models for drug testing. Currently, Dr. Radisic holds research funding from CIHR, NSERC, CFI, ORF, NIH, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Her research findings were presented in over 100 research papers, reviews and book chapters with h-index of 44 and over 6800 citations.  She is a co-founder of a start-up company TARA Biosystems focused on the use of engineered tissues in drug development. 

Schedule of Events

Speaker Bios

Dr. Paul Fedak

Paul Fedak, MD, PhD is a cardiac surgeon and scientist at the University of Calgary. He is committed to the innovation and translation of new surgical therapies for patients with advanced heart disease. He has pioneered novel sternal closure techniques using Kryptonite™ adhesive and is currently developing stem cell and tissue engineering approaches to treat heart failure.

Fedak leads the surgical heart failure program at the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta and implants mechanical pump technology for patients with advanced heart failure. He is Director of the Surgical Approaches to Heart Failure Programme at the Libin Institute and is the director of the Marlene and Don Campbell Translational Research Laboratory at the University of Calgary.

Fedak graduated with honours from University of Toronto medical school and completed further training in cardiac surgery (F.R.C.S.C.) and biomedical science (Ph.D.) in Toronto. He was awarded a Detweiler Fellowship from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada that supported advanced training in surgery for end-stage heart disease at Northwestern University in Chicago. He was recruited to Calgary as a "Clinical Investigator" of the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical research (AHFMR).

He has published more than 75 peer-reviewed original manuscripts and five book chapters in this field. Dr. Fedak serves as an Invited Reviewer and/or Editorial Board Member for 16 leading biomedical publications. He is a "Distinguished Reviewer" of the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. He is the recipient of numerous international and national research awards.

Vaibhav Patel

Vaibhav Patel, PhD, is a basic research scientist at the University of Calgary in the department of Physiology and Pharmacology. He obtained his doctorate degree at M.S. University of Baroda, India in 2011 and then worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alberta’s department of Medicine.

During his postdoctoral training, Dr. Patel’s translational research focused on the role of ACE2/Ang 1-7 in cardiovascular disease and investigated the potential of enhancing ACE2 as a therapy for diabetic cardiovascular complications. He also investigated the novel role of adverse cytoskeletal remodeling in the progression of heart failure.

He has published more than 35 peer-reviewed manuscripts and two book chapters. Dr. Patel’s research interests lie in the role of intercellular communications in cardiac and vascular disease. His current focus is to identify the potential role of perivascular adipocyte-secreted exosomes in intercellular communications and modulation of renin-angiotensin system in the vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells and their impact on vascular disease.

Robert Rose

Robert Rose, MD, PhD, joined the University of Calgary’s faculty in January, 2017. He came to the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta from Dalhousie University's department of Physiology and Biophysics where he was on faculty from 2008 to 2017. He completed his PhD at the University of Calgary in 2005 and postdoctoral fellowship training--in the areas of cardiac electrophysiology and cardiac physiology--at the University of Toronto in 2008.

Rose’s laboratory is interested in the cellular and molecular basis for cardiac arrhythmias caused by genetic mutations or in the setting of common forms of heart disease such as hypertension, heart failure and diabetes. Areas of particular focus include sinoatrial node dysfunction and atrial fibrillation. Rose is especially interested in the contributions of electrical remodeling of ion channel function as well as structural remodeling and fibrosis to changes in cardiac function. Our experimental approaches span from the cellular and molecular levels to the organ and organism levels.

Q&A With Milica Radisic, PhD

Milica Radisic, PhD, knew she'd found her scientific niche when she read about tissue engineering as an undergrad. This year's Libin Institute Tine Haworth Cardiovascular Research Day keynote speaker hopes her work will guide healing and tissue regeneration in the body — and works to help her students become successful in their careers.

Radisic is a professor at the University of Toronto and Canada Research Chair in Functional Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering (Tier 2). She will be presenting the Dr. E.R. Smith Lecture in Cardiovascular Research April 6, on bioengineering functional tissues for drug discovery and therapy.

Q: How did you become interested in research as a career?

A: I have been interested in science since I was a child, probably since I was in elementary school. It was just the question about what exactly in science I would do. At the end of my undergraduate degree at McMaster, I read an article in the Scientific American about tissue engineering, an emerging field at that time. It was clear to me at that moment that I had found the area I would like to work in as a scientist.

Q: Tell us about your research.

A: The long-term objective of my research is to enable cardiovascular regeneration through tissue engineering and development of new biomaterials. We are working with human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) as a source of beating heart cells for our engineered tissues. We are designing new biomaterials to guide cellular response, and we are investigating methods to make both cardiac muscle and vasculature. This work relies heavily on controlling cell environment through microfabrication. My research interests also include microfluidic cell separation and development of in vitro models for drug testing.

Q: Your current research focuses on tissue engineering. How will it help people?

A: It is not possible to take a biopsy from a human heart and make more beating heart cells from the biopsy. This is a big problem in drug discovery, as pharma uses cell lines and animal models that are not fully predictive of the human heart muscle response. Using the methods developed in my lab, it is now possible to make a human heart tissue starting from iPSC for drug discovery and safety testing. These models are already being used by pharma companies through our startup company TARA Biosystems.

Q: What are your ultimate career/research goals?

A: My goals are to provide better healthy and diseased human tissue models for discovery, as well as to develop new biomaterials that can guide healing and regeneration in the body.

Q: What is your favourite thing about being with students?

A: Working with grad students is the best part of my job. As my former chair, Dr. Doug Reeve, said, "You are surrounded by young people who are focused on self-improvement." This is really unique to an academic position. Our students are young, energetic, creative, they have outstanding ideas and they want to succeed. It is really fantastic to be surrounded by them. They keep me young, and it is really for them that I work as hard as possible — to enable their career success.

Q: What is the best piece of advice you would give to up-and-coming researchers?

A: To work on really important (and hard) problems that have not been solved. I think those projects give us the best returns.

Get more information on the Libin Institute's Cardiovascular Research Day and register for a free ticket. Milica Radisic's presentation will be on bioengineering functional tissues for drug discovery and therapy.

The Libin Institute's Tine Haworth Cardiovascular Research Day is an annual event that showcases cutting-edge cardiovascular research presentations from external and internal speakers. The day also consists of a poster competition, "TOD" talks from Libin Institute trainees and speakers, and the Dr. E.R. Smith Lecture in Cardiovascular Research, named in honour of the former dean of the Cumming School of Medicine, Dr. Eldon Smith.

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